Spurgeon on OFI

This was on OFI on January 30th:

Spurgeon on objections to Isaiah 45:22: “Turn to me and be saved, all the ends of the earth! For I am God, and there is no other!”But thou sayest sin will not let thee look. I tell thee, sin will be removed the moment thou dost look. “But I dare not; He will condemn me; I fear to look.” He will condemn thee more, if thou dost not look. Fear, then, and look; but do not let thy fearing keep thee from looking. “But He will cast me out.” Try Him. “But I cannot see Him.” I tell you, it is not seeing, but looking. “But my eyes are so fixed on the earth, so earthly, so worldly.” Ah! but, poor soul, He giveth power to look and live. He saith – “Look unto Me, and be ye saved, all the ends of the earth.”

– Charles Spurgeon, Sovereignty and Salvation

An Approach to Prayer

Danny has some great thoughts here about the benefits of prayer-journaling (writing out prayers based on what you’re reading during your quiet time).  Check it out!

Thoughts on Numbers 22-24

I encountered another tricky passage in my RttBiaY reading last week, when I wrote most of this post…

Numbers 22-24 contains the story of Balaam, a spiritual man, of sorts, but one who also loved the world. Balaam was called by Balak, king of Moab, to curse the people of Israel because they had moved next door – but Balaam ultimately blesses Israel in spite of Balak’s anger against him. There’s a difficult portion of this story which I’d like to examine: Continue reading

Macleod quote from OFI

This was on OFI last month:

“The whole initiative in reconciliation rests with God. It is an expression of His love: ‘God was reconciling the world to himself.’ But God’s love is not itself reconciliation. Between love and reconciliation there lies the great transaction referred to in 2 Corinthians 5:21: ‘[God] made him who knew no sin to be sin for us, so that we might become the righteousness of God in him.’ There is a staggering amount of theology crammed into these few words. There is the sinlessness of Christ; there is the fact that whatever it was He suffered, God was the ultimate cause of it; and there is the fact that His suffering itself amounted to His being made sin. He bore it. He identified with it. He was treated as it deserved to be treated – bruised for it (Isaiah 53:10), accursed for it (Galatians 3:13) and rejected for it (Mark 15:34).

But how did Christ contract such sin? How did He become vulnerable to its retribution? What right did God have to bruise Him? Because He was for us. That made His condemnation – His expulsion to the Far Country – righteous. But then, beside the for, there is another preposition, in. The for made Him guilty. The in makes us righteous: ‘We are the righteousness of God in Him.’ That is why God is reconciled to us – because we are righteous. That is why God justifies us – declares us righteous: because we are righteous. We have in Christ all the righteousness God can require. We are righteous as Christ himself. Indeed, we are God’s own righteousness – we have kept the covenant as faithfully as God Himself.”

– Donald Macleod, Behold Your God (Fearn, UK: Christian Focus, 1995), 105-106.

He’s right – there’s a ton of theology in that short verse! His unpacking of it looks ok to me – how about you?